Servants are more likely to be praised into good conduct— than  scolded out of bad — always commend them when they do right — to cherish  the desire of pleasing in them, you must show them that you are pleased  : —
“Be to their Faults a little blind, And to their Virtues very kind.”
By such conduct, — ordinary Servants, will often be converted into  Good ones ; —few so hardened, as not to feel gratified when they are  kindly and liberally treated.
It is a good Maxim to select Servants not younger than Thirty, — before that age, however comfortable you may endeavour to  make them, their want of experience, and the Hope of something still  better— prevents their being satisfied with their present state.

After, they have had the benefit of experience, if they are tolerably  comfortable, they will endeavour to deserve the smiles of even a  moderately kind master, for Fear they may change for the worse.  Life  may indeed be very fairly divided into the seasons of Hope and Fear. In  Youth, we hope everything may be right ; — in Age, we fear every thing  will be wrong.
Do not discharge a good servant for a slight offence—
“Bear and forbear, thus preached the stoic eagles. And in two words, include the sense of pages.”—Pope.
Human nature, is the same in all stations; — if you can convince your  Servants, that you have a generous and considerate regard for their  Health and Comfort — why should You imagine that They will be insensible  to the good they receive?
A Benevolent old Gentlewoman told us that on Wednesdays and Saturdays  she allowed her servants (three in number) half a Crown to purchase  anything they pleased for Supper — that she was sure, that she saved  much more than double that sum by the general Economy which this  provision for their comfort induced her domestics to observe.
Impose no commands but what are reasonable, — nor reprove but with  justice and temper — the best way to ensure which, is — never to Lecture  them, till at least one day after they have offended you. If they have  any particular hardship to endure in your service, — let them see that  you are concerned for the necessity of imposing it.
If they are Sick,—remember you are their Patron as well as their  Master, — not only remit their labour, but give them all the assistance  of Food, Physic, and every comfort in your power. — Tender assiduity  about an Invalid is half a Cure, — it is a balsam to the Mind, which has  a most powerful effect on the Body, — soothes the sharpest Pains, and  strengthens beyond the richest Cordial.
The following estimate of the Expenses of a Female Servant —was sent  to us by an experienced Housekeeper— They are often expected to find  their own Tea and Sugar, — which with sober servants is the most  comfortable meal they have — and will require
Half a pound of Tea per month, per annum… £3:10:0 Half a pound of Sugar per week, per annum… £3:10:0 4 pair of Shoes, per annum… £0:18:0 2 pair of black worsted Stockings… £0:4:0 2 pair of white Cotton… £0:5:0 2 Gowns… £1:10:0 6 Aprons – 4 check, 2 white… £0:10:6 6 caps… £0:10:6 A bonnet, a Shawl or Cloak, Patterns, &c. Ribands, Handkerchiefs,  Pins, Needles, Threads, Thimbles, Scissors, and other working tools, –  Stays, Stay-tape, and Buckram, &c. &c… £2:0:0
Total £9:8:0
Besides these, She has to make a shift and buy petticoats, pockets,  and many other articles. We appeal to the neatest managing and most  economical Housewife, to inform us how this can be done — and how much a  poor Girl will have remaining to place her account in the Saving Bank, —  for help in Sickness, — when Out of Place, — and for her support in Old  Age. — Here, — is the source, — of the swarms of distressed Females  which we daily meet in our streets.
- The Cook’s Oracle (1822)

Servants are more likely to be praised into good conduct— than scolded out of bad — always commend them when they do right — to cherish the desire of pleasing in them, you must show them that you are pleased  : —

“Be to their Faults a little blind,
And to their Virtues very kind.”

By such conduct, — ordinary Servants, will often be converted into Good ones ; —few so hardened, as not to feel gratified when they are kindly and liberally treated.

It is a good Maxim to select Servants not younger than Thirty, — before that age, however comfortable you may endeavour to make them, their want of experience, and the Hope of something still better— prevents their being satisfied with their present state.

After, they have had the benefit of experience, if they are tolerably comfortable, they will endeavour to deserve the smiles of even a moderately kind master, for Fear they may change for the worse.  Life may indeed be very fairly divided into the seasons of Hope and Fear. In Youth, we hope everything may be right ; — in Age, we fear every thing will be wrong.

Do not discharge a good servant for a slight offence—

“Bear and forbear, thus preached the stoic eagles.
And in two words, include the sense of pages.”—Pope.

Human nature, is the same in all stations; — if you can convince your Servants, that you have a generous and considerate regard for their Health and Comfort — why should You imagine that They will be insensible to the good they receive?

A Benevolent old Gentlewoman told us that on Wednesdays and Saturdays she allowed her servants (three in number) half a Crown to purchase anything they pleased for Supper — that she was sure, that she saved much more than double that sum by the general Economy which this provision for their comfort induced her domestics to observe.

Impose no commands but what are reasonable, — nor reprove but with justice and temper — the best way to ensure which, is — never to Lecture them, till at least one day after they have offended you. If they have any particular hardship to endure in your service, — let them see that you are concerned for the necessity of imposing it.

If they are Sick,—remember you are their Patron as well as their Master, — not only remit their labour, but give them all the assistance of Food, Physic, and every comfort in your power. — Tender assiduity about an Invalid is half a Cure, — it is a balsam to the Mind, which has a most powerful effect on the Body, — soothes the sharpest Pains, and strengthens beyond the richest Cordial.

The following estimate of the Expenses of a Female Servant —was sent to us by an experienced Housekeeper— They are often expected to find their own Tea and Sugar, — which with sober servants is the most comfortable meal they have — and will require

Half a pound of Tea per month, per annum… £3:10:0
Half a pound of Sugar per week, per annum… £3:10:0
4 pair of Shoes, per annum… £0:18:0
2 pair of black worsted Stockings… £0:4:0
2 pair of white Cotton… £0:5:0
2 Gowns… £1:10:0
6 Aprons – 4 check, 2 white… £0:10:6
6 caps… £0:10:6
A bonnet, a Shawl or Cloak, Patterns, &c. Ribands, Handkerchiefs, Pins, Needles, Threads, Thimbles, Scissors, and other working tools, – Stays, Stay-tape, and Buckram, &c. &c… £2:0:0

Total £9:8:0

Besides these, She has to make a shift and buy petticoats, pockets, and many other articles. We appeal to the neatest managing and most economical Housewife, to inform us how this can be done — and how much a poor Girl will have remaining to place her account in the Saving Bank, — for help in Sickness, — when Out of Place, — and for her support in Old Age. — Here, — is the source, — of the swarms of distressed Females which we daily meet in our streets.

- The Cook’s Oracle (1822)

Don’t claw your back as if after a flea; or your head, as if after a louse.
See that your eyes are not blinking and watery.
Don’t pick your nose, or let it drop, or blow it too loud, or twist your neck.
Don’t claw your cods, rub your hands, pick your ears, retch, or spit too far.
Don’t tell lies, or squirt with your mouth, gape, pout, or put your tongue in a dish to pick dust out.
Don’t cough, hiccup, or belch, straddle your legs, or scrub your body.
Don’t pick your teeth, cast stinking breath on your lord, fire your stern guns, or expose your codware before your master.
Hold your knife tight, with two fingers and a thumb, in your midpalm. Do your carving, lay your bread, and take off trenchers, with two fingers and thumb.
Never touch others’ food with your right hand, but only with the left.
Don’t dirty your table or wipe your knives on it.
Take a loaf of trenchers, and with the edge of your knife raise a trencher, and lay it before your lord;
lay four trenchers four-square, and another on the top. Take a loaf of light bred, pare the edges, cut the upper crust for your lord, and don’t touch it after it’s trimmed.
Keep your table clean.
- John Russell’s Book of Nurture (1460)

Don’t claw your back as if after a flea;
or your head, as if after a louse.

See that your eyes are not blinking
and watery.

Don’t pick your nose, or let it drop,
or blow it too loud,
or twist your neck.

Don’t claw your cods,
rub your hands,
pick your ears,
retch, or spit too far.

Don’t tell lies,
or squirt with your mouth,
gape, pout, or
put your tongue in a dish to pick dust out.

Don’t cough,
hiccup, or belch,
straddle your legs,
or scrub your body.

Don’t pick your teeth,
cast stinking breath on your lord,
fire your stern guns, or expose
your codware before your master.

Hold your knife tight, with two fingers and a thumb,
in your midpalm.
Do your carving, lay your bread, and take
off trenchers,
with two fingers and thumb.

Never touch others’ food with your right hand,
but only with the left.

Don’t dirty your table
or wipe your knives on it.

Take a loaf of trenchers, and
with the edge of your knife raise a
trencher, and lay it before your lord;

lay four trenchers four-square,
and another on the top.
Take a loaf of light bred,
pare the edges,
cut the upper crust for your lord,
and don’t touch it after it’s trimmed.

Keep your table clean.

- John Russell’s Book of Nurture (1460)


BREAKFAST Farina with Dates Minced Chicken on Toast Spoon Bread Coffee
LUNCHEON Brown Rice with Cheese Tomato Salad Salted Crackers Cocoa
SUPPER Clear Soup Roast Rolled Forequarter of Lamb Roasted Potatoes Gravy Peas with Mint Spring Salad French Dressing Bananas with Raisin Sauce Coffee
- Good Housekeeping’s Book of Menus, Recipes, and Household Discoveries (1922)

BREAKFAST
Farina with Dates
Minced Chicken on Toast
Spoon Bread
Coffee

LUNCHEON
Brown Rice with Cheese
Tomato Salad
Salted Crackers
Cocoa

SUPPER
Clear Soup
Roast Rolled Forequarter of Lamb
Roasted Potatoes
Gravy
Peas with Mint
Spring Salad
French Dressing
Bananas with Raisin Sauce
Coffee

- Good Housekeeping’s Book of Menus, Recipes, and Household Discoveries (1922)

Look as if you loved the sun, or look cool and unflurried. Either  way, you’ll be a hot-weather beauty. On steaming days in town, your  charm increases according to your success in seeming unperturbed by the  heat. On a blazing beach, it’s attractive to look as if you loved the  sun. In either case, don’t scorch your skin. Sunshine is good for  everybody; but treat it with respect. A bad burn, besides being ugly and  uncomfortable, can cause permanent freckles and irreparable damage to  your skin. So bare your skin for brief periods at first, and use sunburn  preventive liberally and often. Always use it when you come out of the  water.
In the searchlight of the sun, your skin must be clear and silky.  Because of perspiration, it’s good practice to wash and remove make-up  much oftener.
Wear a sunny make-up – darker powder, lipstick of flame-touched pink  or red. Use tinted foundation to ward off freckles and make you look  prettier. Draw lips accurately; blot well, for a smudged mouth looks  hot.
For coolness, mop your neck with skin freshener chilled in the  refrigerator. Cologne, splashed from head to foot, is a fine refresher;  and dusting powder, on you or in your girdle, banishes the sticky  feeling, helps absorb moisture.
For pretty legs, whether bare or in sheer stockings, smooth them with  cream or lotion, and keep them hair-free. Change footwear often; dust  powder on feet and in shoes for extra comfort.
Look spic and span, immaculately clean. Take more baths, using  fresh-scented soap and bath salts. Shampoo oftener, for oil and  perspiration make hair straggly. Wear easy, light-colored clothes. If  dresses become damp in back, pin in a dress-saver of thin cotton. You  can’t be negligent about deodorants. Study them to find out how long  different types protect you against perspiration and odor, and then  space your applications accordingly.
Keep your nails beautifully manicured and lacquered in a soft shade.  They’ll probably improve in summer; hold this advantage by giving them  scrupulous care. If your hands swell, rub wrists with ice or hold them  under a stream of cold water.
- Good Housekeeping (June 1949)

Look as if you loved the sun, or look cool and unflurried. Either way, you’ll be a hot-weather beauty. On steaming days in town, your charm increases according to your success in seeming unperturbed by the heat. On a blazing beach, it’s attractive to look as if you loved the sun. In either case, don’t scorch your skin. Sunshine is good for everybody; but treat it with respect. A bad burn, besides being ugly and uncomfortable, can cause permanent freckles and irreparable damage to your skin. So bare your skin for brief periods at first, and use sunburn preventive liberally and often. Always use it when you come out of the water.

In the searchlight of the sun, your skin must be clear and silky. Because of perspiration, it’s good practice to wash and remove make-up much oftener.

Wear a sunny make-up – darker powder, lipstick of flame-touched pink or red. Use tinted foundation to ward off freckles and make you look prettier. Draw lips accurately; blot well, for a smudged mouth looks hot.

For coolness, mop your neck with skin freshener chilled in the refrigerator. Cologne, splashed from head to foot, is a fine refresher; and dusting powder, on you or in your girdle, banishes the sticky feeling, helps absorb moisture.

For pretty legs, whether bare or in sheer stockings, smooth them with cream or lotion, and keep them hair-free. Change footwear often; dust powder on feet and in shoes for extra comfort.

Look spic and span, immaculately clean. Take more baths, using fresh-scented soap and bath salts. Shampoo oftener, for oil and perspiration make hair straggly. Wear easy, light-colored clothes. If dresses become damp in back, pin in a dress-saver of thin cotton. You can’t be negligent about deodorants. Study them to find out how long different types protect you against perspiration and odor, and then space your applications accordingly.

Keep your nails beautifully manicured and lacquered in a soft shade. They’ll probably improve in summer; hold this advantage by giving them scrupulous care. If your hands swell, rub wrists with ice or hold them under a stream of cold water.

- Good Housekeeping (June 1949)

BREAKFAST Porridge (1 oz oatmeal) Milk (2.5 oz) Bread (6 oz) Bacon (3 oz; on 6 days a week) Fish (4 oz; on the other day) Sugar (0.25 oz) Tea
DINNER Meat (4 oz; on 5 days a week) Bacon (3 oz; on 2 days a week) Potaote (12 oz) Milk Pudding (rice or sago 0.5 oz; milk 5 oz; sugar 0.25 oz) Apple (4 oz) Greens (0.5 lb)
TEA Bread (4 oz) Margarine (0.5 oz) Jam or syrup Tea Milk (1 oz) Sugar (0.25 oz)
SUPPER Bread (6 oz) Cheese (1 oz) or Fish Margarine (0.5 oz) Potato, roast (4 oz) Cocoa Milk (1.5 oz) Sugar (0.25 oz)
- Food and How to Save It (1918)

BREAKFAST
Porridge (1 oz oatmeal)
Milk (2.5 oz)
Bread (6 oz)
Bacon (3 oz; on 6 days a week)
Fish (4 oz; on the other day)
Sugar (0.25 oz)
Tea

DINNER
Meat (4 oz; on 5 days a week)
Bacon (3 oz; on 2 days a week)
Potaote (12 oz)
Milk Pudding (rice or sago 0.5 oz; milk 5 oz; sugar 0.25 oz)
Apple (4 oz)
Greens (0.5 lb)

TEA
Bread (4 oz)
Margarine (0.5 oz)
Jam or syrup
Tea
Milk (1 oz)
Sugar (0.25 oz)

SUPPER
Bread (6 oz)
Cheese (1 oz) or Fish
Margarine (0.5 oz)
Potato, roast (4 oz)
Cocoa
Milk (1.5 oz)
Sugar (0.25 oz)

- Food and How to Save It (1918)

You’ve had a wearing day with the children, or a hard session at the  office. You’re tied up in knots and show it, and in less than half an  hour you must face your public. In that brief time, how can you wipe out  not only the dust and stains of hard work but the strain and tension in  face and body, so that you emerge clean, fresh, and rested? What you do  depends on the time you have, but here is a recipe for quick revival  that will freshen your looks, put sparkle in your spirit.
6 P.M. First of all, relax. It’s the end of a long,  hard day; your throat is tight, you are tired and disheveled. No time  for a refreshing nap, but you can massage your feet and the back of your  neck and shoulders, to take out the ache. You can do a lazy-Daisy,  bending over from the waist, head and arms hanging limply. You can yawn  widely to banish the strain in your throat and face.
6:04. Perk up your hair.  You would like a fresh  shampoo and set, but when the clock is ticking a reminder to hurry, you  brush your hair hard to bring back gloss, roll up wilting curls, dampen  them lightly with cologne, and then let them alone until the last  minute.
6:07. A good wash is the quickest way to brighten a  pale, tired face. Follow the warm sudsing with alternate warm and cool  rinsings. Or, if your skin is very dry, do the trick with two creamings  and a final brisk patting with skin freshener, to bring up color.
6:09. Mouth freshening always makes you feel better,  so no matter how rushed you are, take a few flying seconds to brush  your teeth and rinse with refreshing mouthwash. Already you are looking  pink-cheeked and rested, and the tense expression around your mouth and  eyes has vanished.
6:11. A luxurious, perfumed bath is taken for  granted as a party preliminary. But when there is not a second to spare,  you can make do with a speedy sponge and a fast once-over with cologne,  plus your favorite deodorant.
6:13. Circles under your eyes fade as you spread  tinted base over them. Powder, then take it slowly as you brush mascara  on your lashes and color on your lips.
6:17. Now comb your hair and, tissue between your  lips, slip on your dress. Then pin your curls in place and see what you  have created in 20 crowded minutes.
6:20. Perfume at your throat, on palms, inside elbows – you’re on your way.
- Good Housekeeping (May 1950)

You’ve had a wearing day with the children, or a hard session at the office. You’re tied up in knots and show it, and in less than half an hour you must face your public. In that brief time, how can you wipe out not only the dust and stains of hard work but the strain and tension in face and body, so that you emerge clean, fresh, and rested? What you do depends on the time you have, but here is a recipe for quick revival that will freshen your looks, put sparkle in your spirit.

6 P.M. First of all, relax. It’s the end of a long, hard day; your throat is tight, you are tired and disheveled. No time for a refreshing nap, but you can massage your feet and the back of your neck and shoulders, to take out the ache. You can do a lazy-Daisy, bending over from the waist, head and arms hanging limply. You can yawn widely to banish the strain in your throat and face.

6:04. Perk up your hair. You would like a fresh shampoo and set, but when the clock is ticking a reminder to hurry, you brush your hair hard to bring back gloss, roll up wilting curls, dampen them lightly with cologne, and then let them alone until the last minute.

6:07. A good wash is the quickest way to brighten a pale, tired face. Follow the warm sudsing with alternate warm and cool rinsings. Or, if your skin is very dry, do the trick with two creamings and a final brisk patting with skin freshener, to bring up color.

6:09. Mouth freshening always makes you feel better, so no matter how rushed you are, take a few flying seconds to brush your teeth and rinse with refreshing mouthwash. Already you are looking pink-cheeked and rested, and the tense expression around your mouth and eyes has vanished.

6:11. A luxurious, perfumed bath is taken for granted as a party preliminary. But when there is not a second to spare, you can make do with a speedy sponge and a fast once-over with cologne, plus your favorite deodorant.

6:13. Circles under your eyes fade as you spread tinted base over them. Powder, then take it slowly as you brush mascara on your lashes and color on your lips.

6:17. Now comb your hair and, tissue between your lips, slip on your dress. Then pin your curls in place and see what you have created in 20 crowded minutes.

6:20. Perfume at your throat, on palms, inside elbows – you’re on your way.

- Good Housekeeping (May 1950)

BREAKFAST Grapefruit Boston Baked Beans Brown Bread Toast Coffee
DINNER Salsify Soup Browned Chicken Fricassee Riced Potatoes Buttered Carrots Endive Salad Cream Cheese Crackers Apricot Velvet Little Pound Cakes Coffee
SUPPER Cheese Spread Toast Crackers Floating Peaches Cake Milk
- Good Housekeeping’s Book of Menus, Recipes, and Household Discoveries (1922)

BREAKFAST
Grapefruit
Boston Baked Beans
Brown Bread Toast
Coffee

DINNER
Salsify Soup
Browned Chicken Fricassee
Riced Potatoes
Buttered Carrots
Endive Salad
Cream Cheese
Crackers
Apricot Velvet
Little Pound Cakes
Coffee

SUPPER
Cheese Spread
Toast
Crackers
Floating Peaches
Cake
Milk

- Good Housekeeping’s Book of Menus, Recipes, and Household Discoveries (1922)

Those who suffer from a furred tongue and a bad taste in the mouth in  the morning will do well to go without breakfast until these conditions  disappear, or to breakfast on a glass of hot water and a couple of  oranges. Those who sup or dine at an extremely late hour, and  over-heartily, or who go to bed while food still remains undigested in  the stomach, will also be benefited by the no-breakfast plan, or the  substitution of a glass of hot, slightly salted water. But it is unwise  for normal men and women who lead regular, healthful lives, to go  without this important meal though the practice of dispensing with  breakfast has its advocates, who are fond of telling how much better  they feel since they cut out the meal and how much housework it has  saved. The sophistical argument is made use of that the body, after the  rest of the night and the recuperation of sleep, is not in need of food;  but the fact is lost sight of that the machinery of the body, the  heart, lungs, etc., have been constantly employed during sleep, and food  is needed in the morning to supply fuel for their energies, just as  fuel is needed to replenish the house furnace.

Further, it is well known to be a severe tax on the eyes  to use them for writing, reading, sewing, or similar work before the  morning fast is broken.

More important still is it that children should have an appetizing,  sufficient, and unhurried breakfast before they go to school, or before  any work at home is required of them. All early risers, who engage in  work or exercise long before the hour for the family breakfast, should  have something like crackers and milk, a cup of cocoa, or a glass of  warm milk as soon as they are dressed. In line with this let us quote a  sentence from the instructions of a famous general, who writes as  follows to his commanding officers: “The Commanding Officer should see  that his officers and men have something to eat and drink before they  begin their work, no matter how early; e.g., a cup of hot coffee and a  biscuit before the regular breakfast.” If this was found necessary for  hardy soldiers, it is even more needful for civilians.
- Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners: how to plan  them, how to serve them, how to behave at them (1920)

Those who suffer from a furred tongue and a bad taste in the mouth in the morning will do well to go without breakfast until these conditions disappear, or to breakfast on a glass of hot water and a couple of oranges. Those who sup or dine at an extremely late hour, and over-heartily, or who go to bed while food still remains undigested in the stomach, will also be benefited by the no-breakfast plan, or the substitution of a glass of hot, slightly salted water. But it is unwise for normal men and women who lead regular, healthful lives, to go without this important meal though the practice of dispensing with breakfast has its advocates, who are fond of telling how much better they feel since they cut out the meal and how much housework it has saved. The sophistical argument is made use of that the body, after the rest of the night and the recuperation of sleep, is not in need of food; but the fact is lost sight of that the machinery of the body, the heart, lungs, etc., have been constantly employed during sleep, and food is needed in the morning to supply fuel for their energies, just as fuel is needed to replenish the house furnace.

Further, it is well known to be a severe tax on the eyes to use them for writing, reading, sewing, or similar work before the morning fast is broken.

More important still is it that children should have an appetizing, sufficient, and unhurried breakfast before they go to school, or before any work at home is required of them. All early risers, who engage in work or exercise long before the hour for the family breakfast, should have something like crackers and milk, a cup of cocoa, or a glass of warm milk as soon as they are dressed. In line with this let us quote a sentence from the instructions of a famous general, who writes as follows to his commanding officers: “The Commanding Officer should see that his officers and men have something to eat and drink before they begin their work, no matter how early; e.g., a cup of hot coffee and a biscuit before the regular breakfast.” If this was found necessary for hardy soldiers, it is even more needful for civilians.

- Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners: how to plan them, how to serve them, how to behave at them (1920)

A Ten o’Clock Company Breakfast Grapefruit stuffed with Cherries Broiled Fish Sliced Cucumbers Savory Omelet Potato Puffs Fresh Tomatoes Wheat Muffins Hot Rolls Cream Waffles with Butter and Crushed Fresh Strawberries Coffee
A Twelve o’Clock Company Breakfast Orange and Malaga Grape Cocktail Fish Souffle Lattice Potatoes Deviled Kidneys Mushrooms Maryland Chicken Rice Cress with French Dressing Toasted Crackers Cream Cheese Pineapple Parfait Lady Fingers Coffee
- Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners: how to plan  them, how to serve them, how to behave at them (1920)

A Ten o’Clock Company Breakfast
Grapefruit stuffed with Cherries
Broiled Fish
Sliced Cucumbers
Savory Omelet
Potato Puffs
Fresh Tomatoes
Wheat Muffins
Hot Rolls
Cream Waffles with Butter and Crushed Fresh Strawberries
Coffee

A Twelve o’Clock Company Breakfast
Orange and Malaga Grape Cocktail
Fish Souffle
Lattice Potatoes
Deviled Kidneys
Mushrooms
Maryland Chicken
Rice
Cress with French Dressing
Toasted Crackers
Cream Cheese
Pineapple Parfait
Lady Fingers
Coffee

- Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners: how to plan them, how to serve them, how to behave at them (1920)

The woman who gaily crowns a mass of auburn locks with a  biscuit-coloured hat garlanded with bright pink roses – and, strange  though it may seem, red-haired people have often a passion for pink and  crimson – does not realise that her hair, beautiful as it is in itself,  is a subject which must be studied very carefully in its relation to her  hats.
Let her wear a large picture shape in soft black crinoline, with a  brim which will cast mysterious shadows over hair and dress brow. This  will make a delightful contrast to the vivid locks beneath.

Furthermore, let her drape the crown of her hat with  masses of black tulle, and group on one side of it three or four long  black ostrich feathers. The whole effect will be delightful, and, if she  will refrain from the introduction even of a white osprey or a pale  cream rose, it shall be counted to her for further righteousness.

Brilliant auburn hair, however, even at the present time, is very  rare, unless – low let it be spoken – it is assisted liberally with  henna. The woman who possesses such hair, however, should first choose  black, but there are soft shades of grey and tender blues in which she  may also revel.
White garments are fairly safe, but all tones of rose, pink, crimson, bright violet, or vivid green should carefully be avoided.
- Every Woman’s Encyclopaedia (1910)

The woman who gaily crowns a mass of auburn locks with a biscuit-coloured hat garlanded with bright pink roses – and, strange though it may seem, red-haired people have often a passion for pink and crimson – does not realise that her hair, beautiful as it is in itself, is a subject which must be studied very carefully in its relation to her hats.

Let her wear a large picture shape in soft black crinoline, with a brim which will cast mysterious shadows over hair and dress brow. This will make a delightful contrast to the vivid locks beneath.

Furthermore, let her drape the crown of her hat with masses of black tulle, and group on one side of it three or four long black ostrich feathers. The whole effect will be delightful, and, if she will refrain from the introduction even of a white osprey or a pale cream rose, it shall be counted to her for further righteousness.

Brilliant auburn hair, however, even at the present time, is very rare, unless – low let it be spoken – it is assisted liberally with henna. The woman who possesses such hair, however, should first choose black, but there are soft shades of grey and tender blues in which she may also revel.

White garments are fairly safe, but all tones of rose, pink, crimson, bright violet, or vivid green should carefully be avoided.

- Every Woman’s Encyclopaedia (1910)